Localisation Performance
Measurement
Framework

Localisation performance measurement framework

The first ever World Humanitarian Summit in 2016 outlined the Grand Bargain Commitments that have a transformative potential for the humanitarian sector. However, there is currently no system in place which can be used for action planning and assessing and monitoring progress made in meeting these commitments in a programme, by an organisation or in a humanitarian response.

 

The purpose of this Localisation Performance Measurement Framework (LPMF) is to evidence progress made towards achieving localisation commitments. While its focus is on local and national actors, it is anticipated that it will also be relevant to international NGOs, UN agencies and donors as well as research and academic institutions that are studying or evaluating localisation.

 

The development of the LPMF has been guided by the aspiration to offer an approach that is clear, practical, and that can assist in strengthening the evidence base for localisation and advance a common understanding of the progress that is being made towards achieving this, as well as identifying areas of weakness. While it has been conceived and structured in a particular way, it is anticipated that those using the LPMF will use the parts of it that are most relevant to them, or adapt it to meet their specific needs. The aim is to encourage measurement and research as a means of promoting localisation rather than tying users to one specific approach.


Structure of this document:

 

Section 1: Introduction

Section 2: Glossary of localisation terms

Section 3: A guide to using the framework

Section 3: Who can use the framework?

Section 4: Summary of the localisation performance measurement framework

Section 5: Localisation performance measurement framework

Section 6: Localisation assessment summary

Section 7: Localisation report and action plan

Acronyms:

CRM        Complaints Response Mechanism

GHP        Global Humanitarian Platform

HCT         Humanitarian Country Team

HNO        Humanitarian Needs Overview

HRP         Humanitarian Response Plan

KPI          Key Performance Indicator

L/NA       Local/National Actor

LPMF      Localisation Performance Measurement Framework

NEAR      Network for Empowered Aid Response

INGO       International Non-Governmental Organisation

PoP         Principles of Partnership

SAG         Strategic Advisory Group

TWG       Technical Working Group

UN           United Nations

WHS       World Humanitarian Summit


World Humanitarian Summit The World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) was held in Istanbul, Turkey in May 2016. The purpose of the Summit was to generate commitments to reduce suffering and deliver more effective assistance to people caught in humanitarian crises

The Grand Bargain The Grand Bargain is an agreement between more than 30 of the biggest donors and aid providers, with the aim of strengthening humanitarian assistance. includes a series of changes in the working practices of donors and aid organisations that would deliver an extra billion dollars over five years for people in need of humanitarian aid.

Localisation Localising humanitarian response (or localisation) is a process of recognising, respecting and strengthening the leadership by local authorities and the capacity of local civil society in humanitarian action, in order to better address the needs of affected populations and to prepare national actors for future humanitarian responses. 1

Local and National actors Local or national NGOs that are based in the global south and that are not affiliated in any way to an international NGO. 2

Performance measurement Performance measurement is the process of collecting, analysing and/or reporting information regarding the performance of an individual, group, organisation, system or component.

Direct funding For institutional (mainly government) donors - direct funding from the original donor to local and national. organizations i.e. funding that does not pass through an international intermediary. For UN agencies and international NGOs – the direct onward transfer of publicly- raised funding (i.e. funding that does not come from institutional donors) to local and national organizations. 3

'As directly as possible' funding Funding channelled through a pooled/national fund that is directly accessible to national and local responders. 4

Principles of partnership (PoP) The Global Humanitarian Platform adopted Principles of Partnership (PoP) in 2007 which emphasise the importance of building relationships on the basis of equality, transparency and trust. They include Equality, Transparency, Results-Oriented Approach, Responsibility and Complementarity

Organisational development A change process that aims to build the capacity of an organisation and improve its ability to effectively serve people and respond to their needs

1 OECD (2017) Localising the response: World Humanitarian Summit – putting policy into practice, the commitments into action series.

2 NEAR (2018) Open Letter - Localisation Marker Working Group Definitions Outcome..

3 Ibid.

4 Ibid.

5 The Global Humanitarian Platform (GHP) was an initiative flowing from a July 2006 dialogue between the UN and NGOs with the purpose discussing ways to improve partnerships between diverse humanitarian organisations. The full Principles of Partnership can be found at https://www.icvanetwork.org/principles-partnership-statement-commitment.

 

While this framework focuses primarily on the particular concerns that L/NA’s face in measuring progress towards achieving localisation commitments, it is also relevant to a range of other organisations and tasks including international NGOs and UN agencies, donors and research and academic institutions. The different ways in which it can support reflection, research and evaluation are outlined in the table below. Questions highlighted in red will require an assessment of the progress that has been made towards the impact indicator for each of the localisation components.

 

FRAMEWORK

This framework focuses primarily on the particular concerns that L/NA’s face in measuring progress towards achieving localisation commitments, it is also relevant to a range of other organisations and tasks including international NGOs and UN agencies, donors and research and academic institutions. The different ways in which it can support refection, research and evaluation are outlined below.

Local and National NGOs

Purpose

To measure, report and communicate the progress that has been made towards meeting localisation commitments and to inform advocacy where gaps are identified.

Ways in which the framework can be used:

What is our organisation’s experience of localisation and what progress has been made against each of the different aspects of localisation?

To what extent and in what ways has localisation contributed to changes (positive or negative) in the effectiveness of our humanitarian response?

How can we communicate the performance and impact of localisation to internal and external stakeholders?

Where should we focus our organisation’s advocacy efforts in order to strengthen the pace of localisation?

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International NGOs and UN Agencies

Purpose

To understand how, and in what ways the organisation is supporting localisation and to identify areas where internal change or external advocacy is required to deliver localisation commitments.

Ways in which the framework can be used:

What is our organisation’s understanding of localisation and how does this compare with the commitments that are outlined in the framework?

How effectively is our organisation progressing localisation commitments?

What aspects of localisation is our organisation under-performing in and what policies, systems or approaches need to change to address these?

To what extent and in what ways has localisation contributed to changes (positive or negative) in the effectiveness of our humanitarian response?

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Donors

Purpose

To understand how and in what ways donor policies and procedures are contributing to localisation. To inform advocacy and action in areas where weakness are identified.

Ways in which the framework can be used:

What is our organisation’s understanding of localisation and how does this compare with the commitments that are outlined in the framework?

To what extent are we meeting the key performance indicators on funding? What are the gaps in our policies and practice and how can we address these?

To what extent and in what ways has localisation contributed to changes (positive or negative) in the effectiveness of the humanitarian system?

Where should we focus our organisation’s advocacy efforts in order to strengthen the pace of localisation?

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Research and Evaluation

Purpose

To measure, report and communicate the performance of the humanitarian system in progressing localisation commitments. To inform advocacy and action in areas where weaknesses are identified.

Ways in which the framework can be used:

To what extent and in what ways has progress been made towards achieving localisation commitments?

To what extent and in what ways has localisation contributed to changes (positive or negative) in the effectiveness of humanitarian response?

In what areas has progress not been achieved and what are the reasons for this?

What changes are required in policies or practices and by whom to address the areas of weakness?

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The table below provides a summary of each localisation component included in the LPMF. It outlines the desired change that is anticipated, provides an impact indicator and summarises the key performance indicators.

Guidance notes: Six colour-coded localisation components are listed below. Each component has a desired change which outlines the shifts that needs to occur to contribute to achieving localisation; each has a number of key performance indicators (KPI) which are grouped thematically (e.g. quantity of funding, quality of funding etc.); each has an impact indicator which addresses whether localisation has impacted the humanitarian system.

  • Desired change
    More genuine and equitable partnerships, and less sub-contracting
  • Impact indicator
    Equitable and complementary partnerships between L/NA and INGOs/UN to facilitate the delivery of timely, and effective humanitarian response
  • KPI groups
    (1.1) Quality in relationships, (1.2) Shift from project-based to strategic partnerships, (1.3) Engagement of partners throughout the project cycle
  • Desired change
    Improvements in the quantity and quality of funding for local and national actors (L/NA)
  • Impact indicator
    Increased number of L/NA describing financial independence that allows them to respond more efficiently to humanitarian response
  • KPIs
    (2.1) Quantity of funding, (2.2) Quality of funding, (2.3) Access to ‘direct’ funding (2.4) management of risk
  • Desired change
    More effective support for strong and sustainable institutional capacities for L/NA, and less undermining of those capacities by INGOs/UN
  • Impact indicator
    L/NA are able to respond effectively and efficiently to humanitarian crises, and have targeted and relevant support from INGOs/UN
  • KPI groups
    (3.1) Performance management, (3.2) Organisational development (3.3) Quality standards, (3.4) Recruitment and surge
  • Desired change
    Greater leadership, presence and influence of L/NA in humanitarian leadership and coordination mechanisms
  • Impact indicator
    Strong national humanitarian leadership and coordination mechanisms exist but where they do not, that L/NA participate in international coordination mechanisms as equal partners and in keeping with humanitarian principles
  • KPI groups
    (4.1) Humanitarian leadership, (4.2) Humanitarian coordination (4.3) Collaborative and complimentary response
  • Desired change
    Increased presence of L/NA in international policy discussions and greater public recognition and visibility for their contribution to humanitarian response
  • Impact indicator
    L/NA shape humanitarian priorities and receive recognition for this in reporting
  • KPI groups
    (5.1) Influence in policy, advocacy and standard-setting, (5.2) Visibility in reporting and communications
  • Desired change
    Fuller and more influential involvement of crisis-affected people in what relief is provided to them, and how
  • Impact indicator
    Affected people fully shape and participate in humanitarian response
  • KPI groups
    (6.1) Participation of communities in humanitarian response, (6.2) Engagement of communities in humanitarian policy development and standard-setting

The LPMF provides a means of measuring progress towards localisation. It expands on the summary table and provides a more detailed list of KPIs for each localisation component, a means of verification and strategies for measurement.

Guidance notes: Each localisation component is represented by a colour-coded table. The table lists the desired change, impact indicator and KPI groups. One or more KPIs are listed under each theme. Each KPI has one or more means of verification which are qualitative or quantitative measures which can be used to assess performance. Accompanying these are measurement strategies which provide tools and guidance to support performance assessment (links to specific measurement tools are outlined in annex 1).

  1. Before starting the performance assessment, a decision should be made about which of the localisation components listed in the framework to measure, and for each component, which KPIs outlined in the framework are most relevant.
  2. Once the selection has been made, relevant measurement strategies should be selected from the framework. Performance against relevant KPIs can be assessed through a range of approaches which include key informant interviews, focus group discussions, direct observation, document review and secondary data review. The assessment does not have to include all the KPIs but should include those which are considered most relevant.
  3. Once the scope of the assessment has been defined and measurement strategies have been selected, the research can be conducted.

1. Partnerships

Desired change

More genuine and equitable partnerships, and less sub-contracting

Impact indicator

Equitable and complementary partnerships between L/NA and INGOs/UN facilitate the delivery of relevant, timely and effective humanitarian response.

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

1.1 Quality in relationships

  • L/NA have power in partnerships
  • Relationships with L/NA are guided by the Principles of Partnership (PoP) (equality, transparency, results-oriented approach, responsibility and complementarity) and are periodically reviewed
  • Partnerships have a mechanism by which issues of concern can be raised and resolved

Quality in relationships

  • Partnership Agreements clearly define the nature of the partnership (strategic, project-focused, sub-contractor) and refer to the PoP
  • Partnership quality monitoring tools are routinely used which incorporate indicators for a constructive, quality relationship and which include periodic review
  • Partnership Agreements have a mechanism to address concerns

Quality in relationships

  • Review L/NA Partnership Agreements
  • Review partnership quality monitoring tools
  • Interview senior leaders and partnership management staff from L/NA, their INGO/UN partners and donors

1.2 Shift from project-based to strategic partnerships

  • Existence of longer-term strategic partnerships that commit to build systems and processes that reflect the ambition and goals of L/NA

Shift from project-based to strategic partnerships

  • Year-on-year increase in the proportion of partnership contracts that go beyond project-based activities and provide tangible support for organisational development

Shift from project-based to strategic partnerships

  • Review the nature of L/NA partnership (strategic, project-focused, sub-contract) and document year-on-year change

1.3 Engagement of partners throughout the project cycle

  • Projects and budgets are co-designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated with L/NA and affected people (see Section 6 - Participation)

Engagement of partners throughout the project cycle

  • Evidence of L/NA participation throughout the project cycle (review of assessment, project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation)

Engagement of partners throughout the project cycle

  • Review engagement of L/NA participation in assessment, project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation)
  • Interview L/NA project management staff

2. Funding

Desired change

Improvements in the quantity and quality of funding for L/NA

Impact indicator

A funding environment that promotes, incentivises and supports localisation to enable a more relevant, timely and effective humanitarian response

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

2.1 Quantity of funding

  • The amount of humanitarian funding to L/NA increases in line with Grand Bargain and Charter for Change commitments
  • INGO/UN agencies routinely publish the percentage of funding that they passed on to L/NA
  • New and innovative funding mechanisms are made available to L/NA

Quantity of funding

  • Year-on-year increases in the proportion of total humanitarian funding awarded to L/NA
  • Year-on-year increases in the number of donors/UN agencies that publish the percentage of funding passed on to L/NA
  • Number and types of humanitarian funding mechanisms available in-country for L/NA
  • Existence and effectiveness of innovative financing mechanisms that promote localisation

Quantity of funding

  • Review total annual funding received by L/NA and proportion in comparison with other humanitarian actors (INGO, UN agencies, others)
  • Review data from INGO/UN and donors on the percentage of funding they pass to L/NA
  • Interview funding staff from L/NA, INGO/UN and donors
  • Review number and type of funding mechanisms available in-country for L/NA

2.2 Quality of funding

  • Funding and support are made available to L/NA for emergency response, are provided quickly and include funding to hire additional qualified staff
  • Funding for operating costs (office, warehousing, transport, communications, computing, printing) is included in L/NA funding agreements
  • Overhead costs should be shared equally between L/NA and INGO/UN partners without reporting conditions
  • Funding is provided that is adequate to deliver a response that meets quality standards and commitments exist to avoid/address gaps in funding where this is possible
  • Transparency of financial transactions and budgets between INGO/UN and L/NA
  • Reasonable adjustments required during implementation can be quickly and effectively discussed with the funding agency on equal terms
  • Donors should introduce multi-year financing and incentivise their own grantees to do likewise in order to enable local actors to retain staff, and ensure greater programme, and organisational preparedness, stability and quality
  • INGO/UN actively seek to strengthen the financial sustainability of L/NA partners

Quality of funding

  • Funding available to L/NA within 2-weeks of a crisis for mobilisation of staff, procurement of humanitarian assistance and delivery of response which meets quality standards
  • Extent to which operating costs are covered in L/NA funding agreements
  • Funding contracts include provision for reasonable adjustments to be made during implementation
  • Equality of overhead payments between L/NA and INGO/UN
  • Participation of L/NA in funding decisions and transparency of financial transactions and budgets
  • L/NA salary scales and financial procedures are respected; where it is necessary to strengthen financial procedures, efforts are focused on strengthening systems overall rather than imposing project-based systems
  • Existence of harmonised reporting and accounting procedures in collaborative relationships between international organisations and L/NA
  • Year-on-year increases in the proportion of multi-year humanitarian funding awarded to L/NA
  • INGO/UN support strategies for L/NA to raise funds through international donors

Quality of funding

  • Review funding received by L/NAs within 2 weeks of a crisis
  • Review funding agreements to determine the extent to which they include operating costs, provision for reasonable adjustments and equality of overhead payments
  • Interview L/NA, INGO/UN and donor funding staff to evidence that policies have been used in practice
  • Interview L/NA funding staff to examine participation in funding decisions, to determine the extent to which salary scales and financial systems are respected and to evidence the use of harmonised procedures
  • Review donor reports to determine the existence of harmonised procedures
  • Review proportion of multi-year funding awarded to L/NA
  • Review L/NA funding strategies and INGO/UN contribution to these

2.3 Access to ‘direct’ funding

  • L/NA access funding without an intermediary.
  • Where this is not possible, L/NA can access funding ‘as directly as possible’ (e.g. funding channelled through a pooled/national funds that are directly accessible to L/NA)
  • L/NA have direct access to donors and/or attend donor meetings with their INGO/UN partners

Access to ‘direct’ funding

  • Number of INGO/UN facilitating direct access to donor funding and/or facilitating access to the largest in-country donors
  • Year-on-year increase in direct funding to L/NA and/or funding received ‘as directly as possible’ via a pooled/national fund.
  • INGO/UN encourage and facilitate direct contact between L/NA and donors

Access to ‘direct’ funding

  • Interviews with L/NA funding staff to determine donor engagement
  • Calculate changes in ‘direct’ and ‘as directly as possible’ funding over time.

2.4 Financial management and risk mitigation

  • L/NAs have robust financial management systems and accounting procedures and have a financing strategy in place.
  • Fraud and corruption risks are acknowledged by L/NA and effective systems are put in place to mitigate and manage risk
  • Shift in organisational culture and reduction of donor legislative barriers to funding L/NA

Financial management and risk mitigation

  • Existence of effective financial management systems and financing strategy
  • Existence of L/NA risk management framework which addresses fiduciary, institutional and programmatic risks
  • Increase in the number of donors with a risk appetite and systems in place to fund L/NA

Financial management and risk mitigation

  • Review of financial procedures, audit reports and financing strategy
  • Review of systems to mitigate and manage risk
  • Interviews with L/NA management and project staff
  • Interviews with donors to determine risk appetite and legislative barriers

 

3. Capacity

Desired change

More effective support for strong and sustainable institutional capacities for L/NA, and less undermining of those capacities by INGOs/UN

Impact indicator

L/NA are able to respond effectively and efficiently to humanitarian crises, and have targeted and relevant support from INGOs/UN

 

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

3.1 Performance management

  • Succession planning and performance management systems exist in L/NA and include incentives and accountabilities

Performance management

  • Existence of performance management systems in L/NA which include succession planning
  • Number of L/NA in leadership positions in humanitarian response (national/sub-national cluster co-leadership, HCT, thematic working groups)

Performance management

  • Review performance management systems
  • See 4.1 Humanitarian leadership for an approach to assessing L/NA in leadership positions
  • Interview L/NA human resource and management staff

3.2 Organisational development

  • Organisational development is a core objective of partnerships
  • Capacity assessments are routinely used and there is evidence of efforts to harmonise capacity assessment approaches across the sector
  • Support for organisational development by INGO/UN is coordinated and the results are cumulative.
  • A shared understanding between INGO/UN and L/NA that successful organisational development will result in a change in relationships and greater autonomy

Organisational development

  • Partnership contracts include organisational development
  • Existence of capacity assessments
  • Evidence that organisational development by INGO/UN are coordinated and the number of isolated and/or repetitive efforts have been significantly reduced
  • Evidence of organistational development resulting in ‘graduation’ and/or greater autonomy

Organisational development

  • Review partnership contracts
  • Review capacity assessment documents
  • Interview human resource staff and management from L/NA and donors
  • Review partnerships for evidence of ‘graduation’

3.3 Quality standards

  • Contextualised humanitarian standards, tools and policies are available in relevant local languages
  • Programme and technical staff of L/NA have a sound understanding of humanitarian principles and contextualised quality standards

Quality standards

  • Increase in the proportion of common humanitarian standards, tools and policies that have been contextualised, and key documents such as emergency response procedures that have been translated or developed by L/NA
  • Support by INGO/UN and donors in strengthening L/NA knowledge and practice of humanitarian principles and standards

Quality standards

  • Review standards, tools and policies
  • Interview L/NA management and technical staff to assess the existence and use of contextualised standards
  • Review INGO/UN support for strengthening L/NA knowledge of principles and standards
  • Direct observation of the use of standards

3.4 Recruitment and surge

  • INGO/UN have ethical recruitment guidelines and adhere to them.
  • The staff of L/NA is not actively approached or invited to apply for vacancies with INGO/UN
  • Provision of support by INGO/UN to strengthen L/NA surge mechanisms
  • INGO/UN adopt innovative approaches such as embedding staff and/or shadowing and mentoring L/NA during humanitarian response in preference to substituting capacity.

Recruitment and surge

  • The number of INGO/UN with ethical recruitment guidelines and evidence of their adherence to them
  • Numbers of national and local staff that are approached by or recruited into INGO/UN in the first 6-months after an emergency
  • Existence of surge support by INGO/UN for L/NA in advance of and during humanitarian response
  • Existence of surge mechanisms which are supported by donors
  • Number of INGO/UN that have used alternative means of scaling-up such as embedding staff, shadowing, mentoring

Recruitment and surge

  • Review ethical recruitment guidelines
  • Interview human resource staff from INGO/UN to assess existence and implementation of ethical recruitment guidelines
  • Interview L/NA management and project staff to gather data on number approached and/or recruited by INGO/UN
  • Identify and examine surge mechanisms including deployment data to L/NA and funding from donors
  • Interview L/NA management for evidence of the use of alternative means of scaling-up

 

4. Coordination and complementarity

Desired change

Greater leadership, presence and influence of L/NA in humanitarian leadership and coordination mechanisms

Impact indicator

Strong national humanitarian leadership and coordination mechanisms exist but where they do not, that L/NA participate in international coordination mechanisms as equal partners and in keeping with humanitarian principles

 

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

4.1 Humanitarian Leadership

  • Existing local and national humanitarian coordination and leadership forums are used and supported and new, contextually-appropriate platforms, are not created unless they are required
  • Where clusters are active, a transition plan exists to move humanitarian leadership and coordination to national and sub-national authorities
  • L/NA are members of Humanitarian Country Teams (HCT) or relevant national humanitarian leadership forums
  • L/NA are playing leadership roles in coordination mechanisms (e.g. clusters or sectorial coordination meetings) where appropriate

Humanitarian Leadership

  • Existence of and support to pre-existing humanitarian leadership and coordination forums
  • Application of the principle of government leadership of coordination mechanisms, with the exception of situations where government puts political interests above humanitarian needs or protection concerns
  • Evidence of the relevance of coordination structures from the most recent Cluster Coordination Architecture Review
  • Existence of a cluster transition plan to guide the handover of clusters to national authorities
  • % of seats for L/NA in HCT
  • % of L/NA in co-leadership positions for clusters at national/sub-national level
  • Evidence that donors have made funding available to support L/NA co-leadership of clusters

Humanitarian leadership

  • Examine cluster coordination model and cluster coordination architecture review (if it exists) to determine whether it is supporting or substituting pre-existing humanitarian coordination forums
  • Assess HCT membership
  • Assess cluster co-leadership at national and sub-national level
  • Interview government and L/NA cluster leads and co-leads
  • Interview L/NA and donors to identify initiatives to fund cluster leadership
  • Obtain and examine cluster transition plans (where they exist)

4.2 Humanitarian coordination

  • HCTs and clusters operate in a manner that creates an enabling environment for L/NA
  • L/NA are active members of clusters and are represented in Working Groups

Humanitarian coordination

  • % L/NA that attend and actively participate in/contribute to cluster meetings
  • % of clusters that provide interpretation (in an appropriate language) so that all cluster partners are able to participate
  • % of L/NA members of cluster Strategic Advisory Groups (SAG) and/or Technical Working Groups (TWG)
  • % of L/NA members of Inter-Cluster Coordination Groups (ICCG)

Humanitarian coordination

  • Assess L/NA membership of a sample of clusters
  • Direct observation of cluster meetings to assess participation, use of local languages/interpretation
  • Assess L/NA membership of cluster SAGs and TWGs where relevant
  • Assess L/NA membership of ICCG

4.3 Collaborative and complementary response

  • Humanitarian response is delivered in a way that is collaborative and complimentary (i.e. based on an analysis of the specific strengths/weaknesses of different humanitarian actors)
  • Response strategies recognise the key roles of government and L/NA in strengthening the humanitarian-development nexus
  • Existence of clearly defined parameters for INGO/UN complementing L/NA in response

Collaborative and complementary response

  • Existence of cluster strategies that articulate the complementarity of INGO/UN and L/NA
  • HRPs that articulate the specific strengths/weaknesses of different humanitarian actors and seek to leverage these to strengthen humanitarian response
  • Existence of strategies to link humanitarian response and development interventions that recognise the leadership of government and L/NA

Collaborative and complementary response

  • Review of cluster strategies
  • Review of HRPs
  • Interviews with cluster coordinators/co-coordinators
  • Review of strategies to link humanitarian response and development work

 

5. Policy, influence & visibility

Desired change

Increased presence of L/NA in international policy discussions and greater public recognition and visibility for their contribution to humanitarian response

Impact indicator

L/NA shape humanitarian priorities and receive recognition for this in reporting

 

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

5.1 Influence in policy, advocacy and standard-setting

  • L/NA play a lead role in national humanitarian advocacy
  • L/NA are recognised as key stakeholders in international debates about humanitarian policies that may have significant impact on them
  • L/NA play a lead role in the regional/national/local contextualisation of humanitarian standards
  • L/NA influence donor priorities in-country including programme design and implementation

Influence in policy, advocacy and standard-setting

  • Evidence that L/NA initiate, organise and sign onto advocacy statements in equal numbers to INGO/UN
  • Evidence that L/NA agree and publish policy papers in equal numbers to INGO/UN
  • Engagement of L/NA and NGO networks in humanitarian policy issues and standard-setting
  • # L/NA that participate in the preparation of the Humanitarian Needs Overview (HNO) and Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP)
  • Direct participation of L/NA in donor meetings

Influence in policy, advocacy and standard-setting

  • Review of humanitarian advocacy statements and policy papers
  • Interviews with management and policy staff from L/NA, their international partners and donors
  • Review L/NA participation in the HNO/HRP

5.2 Visibility in reporting and communications

  • L/NA play a lead role in communicating national humanitarian issues both nationally and internationally
  • Recognition of L/NA role, and credit for local design and implementation of programming in INGO/UN reporting
  • Promotion of L/NA for their role in humanitarian action to the international and national media

Visibility in reporting and communications

  • L/NA communications and stories on humanitarian issues receive coverage in national and international media
  • L/NA are accurately credited in programme documents and donor reports for the work they undertake
  • L/NA are promoted by their INGO/UN partners in communications materials for the public and national/international media

Visibility in reporting and communications

  • Review of communications materials and media articles on humanitarian response in national/international media
  • Review of programme documents and donor reports
  • Interviews with communications staff from L/NA, their INGO/UN partners and donors

 

6. Participation

Desired change

Fuller and more influential involvement of affected people in what relief is provided to them, and how

Impact indicator

Affected people fully shape and participate in humanitarian response

Key performance indicators

Means of verification

Measurement strategies

6.1 Participation of affected people in humanitarian response

  • Affected people are actively involved in assessment of needs, and have a say in how assistance is prioritised, the nature and quality of the assistance and the identification of beneficiaries
  • Affected people have information about the implementing agency and have a good knowledge of what the programme is seeking to achieve and who it will benefit
  • Affected people are actively asked for feedback during and after the assistance provision and have a means of making suggestions or providing feedback

Participation of affected people in humanitarian response

  • Humanitarian organisations can show how affected people have participated throughout the project cycle
  • Humanitarian organisations can show how they have elicited suggestions and feedback from affected people and the ways in which they have addressed the issues raised
  • Affected people have knowledge about the implementing agency, the nature of the programme and who it is seeking to assist
  • Affected people are able to explain how they participate in the different aspects of the project cycle
  • Affected people understand the different ways in which they can make suggestions and feedback about the project and can outline how this has led to change
  • Existence of formal mechanisms within L/NA and INGO/UN to provide information to, and ensure the participation of affected people
  • Existence of formal Complaints Response Mechanisms (CRM) and associated management systems in L/NA and INGO/UN to address issues raised and provide feedback

Participation of affected people in humanitarian response

  • Review organisational approaches to community engagement
  • Review formal CRM approaches including procedures for documenting complaints and management responses
  • Interview project staff
  • Conduct focus group discussions with aid recipients to determine (i) the provision of information, (ii) their participation throughout the project cycle, and (iii) the effectiveness of feedback or complaints mechanisms

6.2 Engagement of affected people in humanitarian policy development and standard-setting

  • Deliberations and decisions of humanitarian leadership and coordination forums are informed by in-depth situational understanding, including the views of affected people
  • Humanitarian policies and standards are informed by the experience and voices of the affected people

Engagement of affected people for humanitarian policy development and standard-setting

  • humanitarian leadership and coordination forums are able to indicate how decision-making has been informed by affected people
  • Humanitarian organisations can show how their policy and standard-setting work has been informed by consultation with affected people
  • Affected people validate the issues raised on their behalf and the relevance of contextualised standards.

Engagement of affected people for humanitarian policy development and standard-setting

  • Interview humanitarian leaders and senior agency staff to determine how decision-making has been informed by affected people
  • Review HRP, HNO, cluster strategies to gauge the participation of affected people
  • Review a sample of cluster assessments
  • Conduct focus group discussions with aid recipients to determine their engagement in policy development and standard-setting

The localisation assessment summary offers a simple way to determine whether progress towards localisation commitments is being achieved. The use of a simple traffic light system to indicate progress, and a brief descriptor for each of the KPIs allows calibration and comparison of the findings from the measurement framework. It also provides an indication of where good progress against localisation commitments is being achieved and where there is still scope for improvement.

 

Guidance notes: Use the three-point scale to indicate the progress that has been achieved – poor, modest, excellent. Indicate the results of the assessment directly into the table. If the framework is used on successive occasions, progress that has been made against the indicators can be observed. A summary assessment box has been included for each localisation component to allow an overall performance assessment to be made.

 

Localisation component

 

Localisation progress

1. Partnerships

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

1.1 Quality in relationships

L/NA exercise power in partnerships
PoP are explicitly referred to in all partnership agreements
Partnership quality monitoring tools are used
Partnership reviews are conducted
Concerns about the partnership can be effectively addressed

1.2 Shift from project-based to strategic partnerships

L/NA has strategic partnerships which support organisational development

1.3 Engagement of partners throughout the project cycle

L/NA routinely participate in all aspects of the project cycle

 

 

Summary assessment for partnership

 

 

2. Funding

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

2.1 Quantity of funding

Increases in humanitarian funding to L/NA
INGO/UN publish the % of funding that they pass to L/NA
Increases in the number of funding mechanisms being made available to L/NA

2.2 Quality of funding

Provision of funding for L/NA for a new humanitarian response within 2-weeks
Funding for operating costs including relevant institutional costs
Overhead costs shared equally between L/NA and INGO/UN with no reporting
Funding is provided that is adequate to meet quality standards
Transparency of financial transactions and budgets with L/NA
Flexibility for L/NAs to make reasonable adjustments during implementation
Availability of multi-year financing for preparedness, stability and quality
INGO/UN actively seek to strengthen the financial sustainability of L/NA

2.3 Access to ‘direct’ funding

Changes in L/NAs access to direct funding
Changes in L/NAs access to funding with a single intermediary
Increases in L/NA direct access to donors

2.4 Risk management

L/NAs have robust financial management systems and accounting procedures
L/NAs have effective systems in place to mitigate and manage risk
Pace of change in organisational culture/reduction of donor barriers to fund L/NA

Summary assessment for funding

3. Capacity

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

3.1 Performance management

Effectiveness of L/NA performance management strategies
L/NA have succession plans in place for core posts

3.2 Organisational development

Organisational development is a core objective of partnerships
Capacity assessments are routinely used
Organisational development is coordinated and the results are cumulative
Successful organisational development results in greater L/NA autonomy

3.3 Quality standards

Standards are contextualised and available in the local language

3.4 Recruitment and surge

INGO/UN organisations have ethical recruitment guidelines and use them
L/NA staff are not approached within 6-months of a crisis
INGO/UN support L/NA surge mechanisms
INGO/UN use innovative approaches to support L/NA surge

Summary assessment for capacity

4. Coordination and complementarity

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

4.1 Humanitarian leadership

Support is provided to pre-existing leadership and coordination forums
L/NA are members of HCT
L/NA are in co-lead positions in clusters

4.2 Humanitarian coordination

HCTs and clusters provide an enabling environment for L/NA
L/NA are active members of clusters and are represented in Working Groups

4.3 Collaborative and complimentary response

Humanitarian response is delivered in a collaborative & complimentary way
Response strategies outline the roles of gov. and L/NA to strengthen the hum-dev nexus

Summary assessment for coordination and complementarity

5. Policy, influence and visibility

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

5.1 Influence in policy, advocacy and standard-setting

L/NA play a lead role in national humanitarian advocacy
L/NA play a lead role in the contextualisation of humanitarian standards
L/NA influence donor priorities in-country

5.2 Visibility in reporting and communications

L/NA play a lead role in communicating national humanitarian issues
L/NA are credited in reports for the work they undertake
L/NA are promoted by their INGO/UN partners in communications materials

Summary assessment for policy, influence and visibility

6. Participation

 

Poor

Modest

Excellent

6.1 Participation of communities in humanitarian response

Affected people have a say in the assistance that they receive
Affected people have information about programmes and participate in them
Affected people can provide feedback or make complaints

6.2 Engagement of communities in humanitarian policy development and standard-setting

Humanitarian decision-making is informed by the views of affected people
Humanitarian policies and standards are informed by affected people

Summary assessment for participation

Use the table below to summarise the current state of localisation and to identify areas for further improvement to focus efforts to strengthen localisation.

Guidance notes: Write a brief summary of the overall findings for each of the components in the third column. Discuss the key changes that are still required to make progress towards each of the localisation impact indicators and summarise these in the fourth column. The fifth column can be used to outline actions that need to be taken to make further progress. These should be specific and should include details of what needs to be done, by whom and by what date.

 

Localisation action planning template

Component

Impact indicator

Summary of findings

Changes still required

Proposed actions

1. Partnerships

Equitable and complementary partnerships between L/NA and INGOs/UN

Write a short description for each component of localisation to summarise the findings from the localisation measurement framework.

What additional changes are required in order to make progress towards the impact indicator?

What actions are required, by whom and by when?

2. Funding

A funding environment that promotes, incentivises and supports localisation to enable a more relevant, timely and effective humanitarian response

 

 

 

3. Capacity

L/NA are able to respond effectively and efficiently, and have targeted and relevant support from INGOs/UN

 

 

 

4. Coordination and complementarity

Strong national humanitarian leadership and coordination mechanisms exist but where they do not, that L/NA participate in international coordination mechanisms as equal partners and in keeping with humanitarian principles

 

 

 

5. Policy, influence and visibility

L/NA shape humanitarian priorities and receive recognition for this in reporting

 

 

 

6. Participation

Affected people fully shape and participate in humanitarian response

 

 

 

Developed by Andy Featherstone on behalf of the Network for Empowered Aid Response (NEAR), March 2019